Appetizing Thoughts: The Difference Between Hard Cider and Apple Cider Beer

Roast Curry Hard Apple Cider Beer & Cabbage

Do you know the difference between hard cider and apple cider beer? The public relation’s representative for Angry Orchard gently reminded me when a recipe for Angry Orchard Summer Ale Hard Cider Beer Shrimp Boil was published last summer. Oh… well that was quite an error on my behalf. But, I did notice a few friends mention how they love “…Angry Orchard’s Apple Cider Beer…” Wait… Am I the only one who mistakenly thought it’s the same product with various names or brands? According to Time Magazine, the production of American hard cider more than tripled from 2011 to 2013, from 9.4 million gallons to 32 million gallons. Which means, there could be quite a few people who are confused about the difference. If we’re part of a growing trend of increasingly purchasing hard ciders, perhaps we should learn more about it.The Angry Orchard’s public relation’s representative accepted my request to interview Ryan Burk, Angry Orchard’s Head Cider Maker. Cheers to learning about hard cider in the interview, and towards the end, get a recipe for Roast Curry Hard Cider Chicken and Cabbage.

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{Appetizing Event} Taste 15: Milk Does the Body Good, Part III

Star Anise Pumpkin Ice Cream
Similar to most conversations about the nutritional benefits of certain ingredients, dairy is surrounded by misinformation, and people drink the the dairy mythology by the gallons. After interviewing Krista of The Farmer’s Wifee about dairy farms, I wanted to follow up with an interview about the nutrition of dairy with Sarah Downs, a registered dietitian with Best Food Facts. After reading both Krista and Sarah’s interviews, leave a comment to share your thoughts about dairy or the Star Anise Pumpkin Ice Cream that follows the interview.

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The Year of Maple Syrup

Maple Thyme Chicken Thighs and Pears

2014 was the year that failure was recognized as an attribute towards the journey of success. That’s if the lesson was learned from the act of failure. This recipe was a difficult dish to develop. It was perfect the first time. The second attempt was too sweet. The third try lacked a flavorful taste. And, when the dish was finally successful, it was perfect.

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